Just sharing a few recipes

Mike Stafford

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Coastal plain of North Carolina
I grew up out in the country where coon and possum were frequently on the menu. Not for me but for people who were a lot hungrier than me and that is saying something in itself.
But I did learn a bit about how to make sure your possum or coon is fresh. Here is what you are supposed to do. When you are driving to town spray paint a bright color on all the road kill possums and coons that you see. Then as you are driving home if you spot any road kill possums or coons without paint you know they are fresh.
Possum in road.JPG This one is not fresh.

And, of course, if you are too lazy for all that you can buy your delicacies already prepared.

1509148_771013099601740_2246155954216126615_n.jpg Ummm um good!
 
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Victoria BC
One Sunday evening around 7 pm my at the time 7 year old grandson and I were heading to a nearby drugstore for a junk food fix when when we stopped at a traffic light at a pretty major intersection and lo and behold manna from heaven right in front of us laying smack dab in the middle of the intersection 3 nice sized Sockeye salmon. I did a quick pull over and grabbed all 3 and popped them into a black garbage bag I had in the trunk. There were no tire marks or anything on them and no traffic on the road. Some one returning from a fishing trip must have caught the light just ahead of us and when the light changed hit the gas hard and the fish probably slid off the transom of the boat where they were likely left mistakenly. Dakota and I still talk about going road fishing.
 

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Vaughn McMillan

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ABQ NM
Brian wins the thread! Road salmon...them's good eatin'! :rofl:

When I was touring with the band in the '80s we met a guy at an after-hours party in Wyoming who tried real hard to convince us to go up the road a piece and pick up the freshly-killed deer he'd seen that night on the way to the bar. (He'd heard us complaining about not having much money for eating while on the road.) We politely declined, lol. Same guy regaled us with his tales of hunting bears from a tree stand with a spear. :rolleyes:

Back to the tasty recipes, I follow a Facebook group called Disgusting Vintage Recipes. I'll have to find a few of those to share here. :D
 

Mike Stafford

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Coastal plain of North Carolina
Brian wins the thread! Road salmon...them's good eatin'! :rofl:
Back in the day when I worked in the food regulatory business I was required to respond to disasters involving foods. Disaster is a very broad term for fire, flood, hurricane, tornado and traffic accident

Road salmon brings to mind a story about a traffic accident involving a tractor trailer loaded with iced salmon. There are a number of large truck stops along I-95. These truck stops usually intersect with other highways frequented by tractor trailers. On this fateful day a truck pulling a trailer loaded with 37,000 pounds of iced salmon in waxed cardboard boxes pulled out of the truck stop directly into the path of a logging truck The logging truck was unable to stop and drove completely through the trailer containing all that fish.

The Highway Patrol called me to come to the scene to help make a determination of disposition for that load of fish. It was a rather easy disposition as there were gutted salmon carcasses covering the highway for hundreds of yards.

I reported in to the Incident Commander who was a grim-faced Sergeant in the Highway Patrol. This man was at least 6'6" tall and looked to be able to take care of himself. We were standing there surveying the scene when he turned to me and with a serious tone in his voice asked, "What in the world are we going to do with all this fish?"

I looked back at him and just as seriously asked, "Do you know where we can find a charcoal grill?

He looked me in the eye and all of a sudden he started laughing and continued laughing until I thought he was going to bust a gut.

The fish had to be buried in the landfill. We were unable to get hold of a company which salvages animal protein for animal feed. Burying that fish was such a waste but under the law a food stuff such as these salmon carcasses were no longer being held under refrigeration and had been subjected to the potential contamination of various forms of filth and as such was deemed adulterated under the Food Law.

The wrecker company had their employees pick up all of the fish and toss it into a large dump trailer. I followed it to the nearest landfill and witnessed it being buried.

This was a lot of "road salmon" that could have been rinsed off with a water hose and cooked on a charcoal grill. Just saying.

I worked a lot of disasters in my time. Many fires, floods and wrecks....tornadoes, hurricanes and even a couple of times murders that resulted in the adulteration of foods.
 

Chuck Ellis

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Tellico Plains, Tennessee
I grew up out in the country where coon and possum were frequently on the menu. Not for me but for people who were a lot hungrier than me and that is saying something in itself.
But I did learn a bit about how to make sure your possum or coon is fresh. Here is what you are supposed to do. When you are driving to town spray paint a bright color on all the road kill possums and coons that you see. Then as you are driving home if you spot any road kill possums or coons without paint you know they are fresh.
My grandfather lived in east Texas about the turn of the century.... he died in 1945, but my aunts told stories about how much he liked 'possum... one aunt said the more she chewed it, the bigger the bite got in her mouth..... when the grand babies were visiting he always took one or the other to the table and fed them.... don't really like to think about it, but it's likely he fed me 'possum at one time or another.:(... I was just under 4 when he died and the only grandson, so I'm sure I got more attention than my sisters or other female cousins.
He was not poor, he owned 80 acres of good bottom farmland and made good crops. He had 5 sons and 5 daughters to help work the land.
 

Mike Stafford

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Coastal plain of North Carolina
.. one aunt said the more she chewed it, the bigger the bite got in her mouth.....
I haven't heard that expression in a long time. I recall my grandfather saying that on occasion. He would eat possums, squirrels, rabbits, turtle and most anything else but he would not eat turkey. At Thanksgiving he would eat fried chicken. I wonder if he would have eaten deep fried turkey.
 

Ryan Mooney

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The Gorge Area, Oregon
Looks like I am going to be harvesting Paw Paws again this year for the Cheese Cake recipe :drool:

I tried growing paw paws in WA.. they were "kind of doing ok but to small to fruit" when we moved.. I suspect the new owners probably didn't try to save them, it's marginal country for growing them anyway. Long way of saying that I've read about them but never actually got to try one.
 
I tried growing paw paws in WA.. they were "kind of doing ok but to small to fruit" when we moved.. I suspect the new owners probably didn't try to save them, it's marginal country for growing them anyway. Long way of saying that I've read about them but never actually got to try one.
I planted 10 of them and all was good until the help mowed them all down
 

Chuck Ellis

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Location
Tellico Plains, Tennessee
I haven't heard that expression in a long time. I recall my grandfather saying that on occasion. He would eat possums, squirrels, rabbits, turtle and most anything else but he would not eat turkey. At Thanksgiving he would eat fried chicken. I wonder if he would have eaten deep fried turkey.
My did didn't like turkey either... the first thanksgiving after I moved back to Texas I had the family up (or rather down to Houston) for dinner.... they all enjoyed the turkey I served except Dad... his wife (my step mother) brought a baked chicken for his dinner.

For a number of years I wasn't all that fond of turkey myself.... that stemmed from being flogged by a Tom when I was about 3 1/2 years old.... Grandpa sent me out to close a gate in front of the house, but warned me to watch out for the Tom..... sure enough he flogged, jumped into my back and scared a 3 year old out of any fondness of turkey for a number of years.
 

Chuck Ellis

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Messages
6,514
Location
Tellico Plains, Tennessee
I tried growing paw paws in WA.. they were "kind of doing ok but to small to fruit" when we moved.. I suspect the new owners probably didn't try to save them, it's marginal country for growing them anyway. Long way of saying that I've read about them but never actually got to try one.
I think I have a paw paw tree going at the back side of a gully behind my burn pit.... I've seen the leaves on the tree, but not any fruit.... it's actually on the neighbors property as my line cuts across the little gully near the end of it.... I'll have to watch again this year to see if we get fruit.... never had any.

I've been grown a fig plant for 5 years and haven't gotten a fig off it yet... squirrels or deer get them before I can...... I need to move the plant out into more sunshine anyway... it's in too much shade and too close to the wooded part of my lot.
 
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