New Lathe Ordered

Rich Aldrich

Member
Messages
297
Location
Manistique, Michigan
I just ordered a Jet 1642 - 1 1/2 HP lathe from Amazon for $1652 with free shipping. It was a tough decision with all of the good lathes out there.

I almost went with the G0698, but there are a couple of reviews out there with low end erratic speed issues. However, some VFDs do have speed hunting issues with no load as we have seen at our paper mill.

I like the 5 year warantee with the Jet, for what a warantee might be worth. Although neither of us have ever turned on a lathe before, my wife also had an influence in this decision :huh:(she probably wont turn on it either - her choice not mine - I would love to see her get the bug). Her only input was get the one that is proven and you won't be worried - there is always some risk with first year releases.:dunno:

I have never turned before, but I think I will like it. This is quite a starter lathe, but I don't expect to ever have to replace it. I wonder if I can turn pens on it?:rolleyes: The lathe might be kind of big.

Delivery is expected to be Feb 19 or 22.

(PS - dont tell Larry):rofl:
 

Dennis Kranz

Member
Messages
260
I have the 1642 and you made a very good choice. The lathe I think will run forever. If only I could get my kids into turning I belive this machine would be all they would ever need. Have fun.
Dennis
 

Vaughn McMillan

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
33,362
Location
ABQ NM
Congrats, Rich. :thumb: That's a great lathe. And as to your pen question...you can always turn small stuff on a big lathe...just can't turn big stuff on a small lathe. :)

I see that New Lathe Season is now upon us. :D
 

Wayne Bower

Member
Messages
854
Location
Des Moines, IA
Rich, I purchased the Jet last summer myself. That is a sweet lathe. I have the 1.5 hp model. It has done everything I have tried to do very well. Good Luck with the lathe. :thumb:
 

Frank Fusco

Member
Messages
12,320
Location
Mountain Home, Arkansas
Congrats. As you say, a lot of choices out there these days. You made a good choice. It is way beyond a 'starter' lathe. Should serve you until you hang up your tools.
As for pens, you really need a powerful 16" X 42" lathe to make 5" pens. ;)
It will work for pens just fine.
 

Chuck Ellis

Member
Messages
5,642
Location
Tellico Plains, Tennessee
Congrats Rich... you'll like the lathe...it's a good choice.
I looked at the 1642 when I bought mine last year... I wound up with the Jet 1442 because at the time I was thinking I would be doing some turning outboard and the 1642 doesn't have a swiveling head stock like the 1442. The layout of my shop wouldn't work for the sliding headstock to the end of the ways like you have to do on the 1642.... all that and in a year, I still haven't done any outboard turning and I really would have liked the EVS of the 1642. In retrospect, if I were doing it again, I think I would have gotten the 1642... enjoy.. it's a great machine and I make pens on my 1442 and my 1014 mini... just which ever is available when I start.
 

Bart Leetch

Member
Messages
3,209
Location
Clinton, Washington on Whidbey Island
I

I almost went with the G0698, but there are a couple of reviews out there with low end erratic speed issues. However, some VFDs do have speed hunting issues with no load as we have seen at our paper mill.

I noticed this problem is found below 100 rpm & because I am interested in this lathe I printed out the manual, on page 25 they recommend a speed of 190 rpm for roughing out a 16" bowl if your having trouble below 100 rpm maybe this is the answer. I don't have the answer to this but thought this recommendation interesting. This leaves you with 90 rpm leeway before you hit 100 rpm. So you could still drop the rpm 35-40 rpm & still be at 150 rpm for a 18" bowl It looks like they are recommending a increasing roughing speed variable as the diameter decreases.
 
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Frank Fusco

Member
Messages
12,320
Location
Mountain Home, Arkansas
I noticed this problem is found below 100 rpm & because I am interested in this lathe I printed out the manual, on page 25 they recommend a speed of 190 rpm for roughing out a 16" bowl if your having trouble below 100 rpm maybe this is the answer. I don't have the answer to this but thought this recommendation interesting. This leaves you with 90 rpm leeway before you hit 100 rpm. So you could still drop the rpm 35-40 rpm & still be at 150 rpm for a 18" bowl It looks like they are recommending a increasing roughing speed variable as the diameter decreases.

There are almost identical, parallel threads, running on this subject.
See my post #13 here: http://familywoodworking.org/forums/showthread.php?p=204233#post204233
 

Vaughn McMillan

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
33,362
Location
ABQ NM
...I printed out the manual, on page 25 they recommend a speed of 190 rpm for roughing out a 16" bowl...

That's the lawyers talking, not a woodturner. There are several variables that dictate roughing speed. Diameter is just one of them. On some 16" blanks 190 rpm would be too fast for roughing. On others, it'd be too slow, IMHO.

...It looks like they are recommending a increasing roughing speed variable as the diameter decreases.

That's pretty common and basic physics. The spindle speed is virtually meaningless. It's the surface speed of the wood at the cutting tip that's important. For any given spindle speed, the surface speed will increase as the diameter increases. ;)
 

Rich Aldrich

Member
Messages
297
Location
Manistique, Michigan
It has Arrived!

I picked up the lathe at the paper mill last night after I got back from Marquette and diving finals.

Manistique High School took first in boys diving. On the girls side, Manistique took second and third, my daughter Emily, took third. Of the top 4 girl divers, my daughter is the only one who is not graduating.

Anyway, on to the lathe. Attached are pictures of it this afternoon sitting on the trailer. I have to make room in the shop. I am completing a top for a hutch - the top of the bottom cabinet which also serves as the bottom for the top cabinet. I hope to deliver it just before dinner this evening, then clean up for the lathe.

Sorry about the white stuff in the back ground. My grandpa called it Lake Superior smog (this is green smog..... well, actually white... never mind).
 

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Carol Reed

In Memoriam
Messages
5,535
Location
Coolidge, AZ
Congrats, Rich.

Mind your back. That sucker is heavy! I had a overhead hoist to help me get the legs on and move it to its new home. The cast iron legs are a 100#! Want to see you have fun, not nurse a sore back - or worse.

And congrats to the kids for their wins, and to your daughter. Won't she have fun next year!
 

Scott Donley

Member
Messages
105
Location
University Place, WA
For putting it together, if you are by yourself, I found for me it was best to just stand up the legs WITHOUT the the screw on feet, at the correct distance,set the bed on and bolt. Then using a floor jack raise one end at a time to install the feet.I found going by the manual would have broken my back. Congrats on the lathe.
 

Chuck Ellis

Member
Messages
5,642
Location
Tellico Plains, Tennessee
For putting it together, if you are by yourself, I found for me it was best to just stand up the legs WITHOUT the the screw on feet, at the correct distance,set the bed on and bolt. Then using a floor jack raise one end at a time to install the feet.I found going by the manual would have broken my back. Congrats on the lathe.

I still don't have the feet under mine... I felt the height was just right without them.
 

Carol Reed

In Memoriam
Messages
5,535
Location
Coolidge, AZ
I put the feet on mine even though it makes it too high. The reason was it slid easier with the feet on. I happened to have a couple dozen rubber floor mats from my old shop, so I stacked them. Now I am high enough and my feet love the footing.

win-win. :thumb::thumb::thumb:
 

Chuck Ellis

Member
Messages
5,642
Location
Tellico Plains, Tennessee
I put the feet on mine even though it makes it too high. The reason was it slid easier with the feet on. I happened to have a couple dozen rubber floor mats from my old shop, so I stacked them. Now I am high enough and my feet love the footing.

win-win. :thumb::thumb::thumb:

Not sure I want mine too slide easily... I put a piece on it last month that was so out of balance, the lathe moved 6" before I could reach the off swtich... :eek:
I envy Rich's bottom speeds... the bottom of mine is 450 and that too fast for large and out of balance pieces.
 
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