New Shop Construction

Mark Paavola

Member
Messages
13
Location
Northern California
Again, Another new shop is going up. Well it is almost complete at this time but I have pictures!. We started construction in April of this year. We had to have 240yds of dirt brought in so the new shop would be close in elevation to the existing garage. I am a hard core diy type of guy. My wife and I did all of the work except for the concrete and dirt work. I did have help raising the trusses. Tough to do by yourself. The first group of pictures show the front of the house and the beginning of the dirt pad placement to the right of the house. Plenty more to follow. Any questions please ask??
 

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tod evans

Member
Messages
4,993
Location
ozarks
cool mark! please keep the pic-n-commentary runnin`.....if you can`t tell we like shop building threads;)
 

Stuart Ablett

Member
Messages
15,885
Location
Tokyo Japan
Looks good Mark, yes please to more pics!!

Only questions I have so far are; what kind of wood are those trees you cut down, have the logs started spalting, and what kind of lathe do you have/plan to buy :D

Cheers!
 

Frank Pellow

Member
Messages
2,332
Location
Toronto, Ontario, CANADA
Thanks for this thread Mark. I look forward to hearing about the rest of the construction -and seeing the pictures. That's one heck of a lot of dirt!

Also Mark, I'm thinking that this thread might fit better into the 'Carpentry and Constrction' forum. Would you mind if I moved it?
 
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Mark Paavola

Member
Messages
13
Location
Northern California
Stuart, The trees I believe are called valley oak. I have quite a few of these trees. Yes they have spalted. I was going to saw them up and see if the wood is any good. If these become firewood I have plenty more.
 

Mark Paavola

Member
Messages
13
Location
Northern California
Frank, I think moving it is a good idea. I wasn't paying attention when I put it in these forum. It was a lot of dirt. A lot more than the dirt guys planned for. I will post some more pictures later tonite.
 

Mark Paavola

Member
Messages
13
Location
Northern California
Here is the next group of pictures. These show the finished grading and the concrete forms. In addition is the concrete pour. I hired out the grading and concrete work. I would prefer to do the work myself except the dirt compaction and concrete pour takes more friends than I have. The pictures show the new driveway connecting the existing attached garage to the new workshop. This was late April after large amounts of rain for us. The soil around here is heavy clay and once it gets wet it stays wet. The trees in the background are mostly oak with a few pines. I guess some dimensions might help. The shop is 30' wide and 28' deep. This would provide me with enough room to start. If in the future it is not enough I have plans for expanding to the left side of the building. I believe I have plenty of space but I also have a backup plan.
 

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Chris Mire

Member
Messages
947
Location
Southern Louisiana
looking great mark. can't wait to see the rest of the pics. keep em comin

i don't blame you on subin out the concrete. it is alot of work.

thanks for sharin with us
chris
 

Mark Paavola

Member
Messages
13
Location
Northern California
Okay everyone, I have been busy with christmas stuff but here is the next group of construction pictures. The framing took place in May/June of this year. We had a lot of late rain for us which delayed framing for a period. We framed the walls on stud at a time. We did not have the manpower to frame the walls on the ground and then raise them up. So it was one stud at a time. The walls are ten foot high. One other obstacle to framing the walls on the ground and the raising them up is earthquake codes. We don't actually live near eartquake zones but in California it doesn't really matter as far as code requirements. We had to have the usual bolts for the mudsill but in addition all corners and wall sections require a simpson strongtie bracket that bolts to the concrete and is lagged to the wall studs. I had almost as much in brackets and hardware as lumber for framing. Difficult to raise the wall up and over all the bolts. The hardest part was getting the header installed. Very slowly!! These pictures show the outsides framed but not the interior walls for the finish room.
 

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Mark Paavola

Member
Messages
13
Location
Northern California
Yes Frank it took awhile to frame it 1 stud at a time. Having to brace it intially was a problem also. But we got it finished. Now the next pictures are the shear wall being installed. Required around here for earthquake. This was completed fairly quickly because of minimal cutting. We used 4x10x 7/16 osb. The things that I do a little bit different than the contractors is the use of stainless steel nails into the pressure treated. Most contractors use galvanized. I prefer stainless for longevity. That is something the inspectors check for. Also very particular about nail pattern in the shear wall. 4" spacing around edge and 12" in field.
 

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tod evans

Member
Messages
4,993
Location
ozarks
mark, it looks like you`ve done your shop right!.....what stage is it in today? from the way your initial post reads you`re dried in now? tod
 

Mark Paavola

Member
Messages
13
Location
Northern California
Thanks for the comments everyone. Yes Tod I am just about finished. I am now just waiting for the drywall guys to tape and texture the walls. My wife and I hung all the drywall. I hope to show the progression of the projest and provide some details and reason for certain items included. Most of the specific details that differ from a traditional shop are because I wanted to match the existing garage on the house and also because I like things done well. Including the structure that nobody will see except myself. I prefer things level, plumb and suare. So, on with the show. The next sequence is the truss installation. THis required help. I tried to raise them myself. DID NOT WORK. So my son and a couple of friends provided manpower. It's amazing how much work can be done with some help. This was done in July of this year. The trusses are called live load trusses around here. Basically the center web is open for storage and the air handler for the hvac.
 

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Mark Paavola

Member
Messages
13
Location
Northern California
Here is the next stage after trusses. We begin to enclose the shop. First was the roof sheathing. We hauled it up on sheet at a time because it had previously been delivered. After sheeting was shingling the roof. Standard comp shingles to match the existing house. No wood shingles around here. This is Fire Country.:b-day_cake: After the roof was complete, it was on to siding. I used Hardie lap siding again to match existing. Also fire and rot proof. I like this siding except heavy to handle and cement dust when cutting. Some interior details. 100A electrical sub panel fed from the house. 8 - 220v circuits for machinery.
2 - 220v circuits for the HVAC system. 3 - 110v circuits for wall plugs. 2 - 110v circuits for machinery. 2 - 100v circuits for lighting. Seperate finishing room with filtered exhaust hood. Entire structure is insulated. R-44 attic with radiant barrier, R-13 walls, R-8 on the garage door. I have just about decided on the equipment layout but I will have a few questions later on about some upcoming equipment purchases.
 

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